Videos
Click on Video Links for Description

   
  Note: You will need the Free Adobe
Acrobat Reader
to view this document
 
     

Books

Click on Book Links for Description

   
  Note: You will need the Free Adobe
Acrobat Reader
to view this document
 
     
   

Videos

1st Airplane Lands in DeLand (1918)

In 1918, excitement for DeLand residents was high as news of the first airplane had landed on the College Arms Golf Course. This plane was from the flying school at Sebring, Florida. The pilots would take trips on weekends to the beach at Daytona. They would land at low tide and pull their planes into the dunes. If the tide was too high, they would land at the College Arms Golf Course to wait for the tide to go out.

In 1956, Carl Ward leased some of the buildings at the airport and opened the Florida Military School. It was a great success until the Vietnam War started. Military schools all over were victims of the back lash and many had to close because they lost their students. This was a great loss to our community.

Back to top


Hotel College Arms and Golf Course

The hotel was started by J.Y. Parce, brother-in-law of Henry DeLand, who called it the "Parceland Hotel." John B. Stetson bought the hotel in 1896 and changed the name to "College Arms Hotel." He completed the Hotel and added an 18-hole championship golf course, one of the finest in the Country. The top professionals, men and women, played here.

Back to top


Stetson University: The Early Years (1883)

Henry DeLand founded the DeLand Academy, later DeLand College and then DeLand University in 1883. After the severe freezes in 1885, Mr. DeLand's finances could not support the University and he persuaded Mr. Stetson to take over the endowment of the University. In 1886, Mr. DeLand asked the Board of Trustees to change the name of the school to John B. Stetson University. The "John B." was dropped in 1951. The first football teams were started in 1884.

Back to top


Lake Helen, Florida: The Prettiest High Pine Town in the State

In 1883-84, Henry DeLand purchased a 350 acre tract of land to the southeast of DeLand. He was so impressed by the tract's beauty that he could think of no more befitting gesture than to name both its lake and its town after his daughter, Helen.

From its original identity as a winter resort and citrus grove area, Lake Helen evolved as a railroad terminus, lumber mill town, and location for a starch factory, Nautilus Fitness headquarters, and film studios. During these periods of change, the citizens of Lake Helen developed their local government, municipal services and schools. They also developed various forms of recreation, not the least of which were fishing, "sugar parties," and the Lake Helen Baseball Team. Join us in this sentimental journey back to historic Lake Helen and see that, although her enterprises may have changed over the years, her fundamental charm and relaxed beauty have prevailed.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, local historian
Producer: Rosa Meddaugh
Running time: 44 minutes 17 seconds

Back to top


History of the DeLand Fire Department

From its beginnings in the late 19th century, the DeLand Fire Department gave its citizens an excellent return on their investment. The initial annual budget was a mere $350.00! The money all went to equipment; the first firemen were all volunteers.

In 1886, a devastating fire spread from the Wilcox Saloon and reduced the 100 block of North Woodland Blvd. to ashes. Ordinances were soon passed against any more wooden structures in the business district. Saloons were also prohibited through the mid-1930's.

Although horse drawn equipment gave way to modern fire trucks, the department figured prominently in the town's municipal parades during the many decades leading up to the television era. The Department has always been proactive in its community service and fire prevention education roles.

Folk historian Bill Dreggors helps us recall the Fire Department's many growth phases. His narration is richly illustrated by the scores of photographs representing the Department's growth. He identifies most of the firemen, fire chiefs, and even the mischievous boys who scattered the Department's horses soon after the turn of the twentieth century. A hint of pride may be detected in Mr. Dreggor's voice as he describes his own father's career as a volunteer fireman.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, Local Folk Historian
Producer: Rosa Meddaugh
Running time: 30 minutes

Back to top


History of Volusia County's Sheriff Department

According to Folk Historian Bill Dreggors, law enforcement in Volusia County has a history which is colorful enough to create the plots for a whole series of "Who Dunnit" novels. Starting with its first elected Sheriff in 1885, the Department has had to deal with desperadoes, fugitives, shoot-outs, moonshiners, rumrunners, and even lynch mobs. Each of these episodes is illustrated not only by Mr. Dreggors' insightful narrative, but several photographs taken during each period.

This documentary takes the viewer back to the times when several county prisoner work camps were situated so that prisoners could be moved via horsedrawn wagon to their road work, field labor, or turpentine still labor. Also discussed are the effects of the Prohibition era, with moonshine stills and rumrunners showing up in the cross-hairs of the Sheriff's guns. Want to know who was fed road kill on a regular basis? Want to know who was the last Florida prisoner to be executed by hanging? Which jail was referred to as the "Boarding House"? It's all on the inside, folks.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, Folk Historian
Producer: Rosa Meddaugh
Running time: 25 minutes

Back to top


My, How We Have Grown

The history of Volusia County's development is a microcosm of Florida's overall growth. Starting with a handful of hardy pioneers, Volusia needed visionaries to provide investment capital and to promote the area's potential to people up north. One of these visionaries, Henry DeLand, fell in love with the "tall pine" section that he discovered during a rare vacation from his upstate New York factory. The end result: DeLand, Florida.

Next came the role played by railroads, hotels, and tourism. Soon after the East Coast Railroad pushed into Daytona Beach, a host of hotels such as The Breakers, The Neptune, and The Sea Breeze sprouted up. Northerners seeking relief from their cold winters flocked to these hotels from the early 1900's until fires and shifting consumer demand ushered in the motel period during the late 40's and 50's.

The area's industrial plants peaked early in the 20th century, then declined just as the housing industry began to surge. Such was the case when DeBary's Ox Fiber Brushes (made from cabbage palms) gave way to the plastic during the 1960's. At approximately the same time Ox Fiber Brushes shut down, a building boom was starting in nearby Deltona. At first scoffed at by longtime residents, Deltona soon became our largest city.

Narrator Bill Dreggors began to learn and appreciate the history of Volusia's growth while listening to old time stories at his father's knee. His vivid story telling illustrated by a collection of vintage photographs, enables us to travel back to the time when the place we call home was a very different place, indeed.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, local Folk Historian
Produced by: Volusia Magazine

Back to top


Seville, Florida: Tangerine Capital of the World

Seville's origins are in one way, similar to those of nearby DeLand's. Seville's founder, William Lente, just like Henry DeLand, also went broke in the process of attempting to achieve a goal for his town. In Lind's case the goal was a railroad connecting Seville to St. Augustine. When the rails finally came, they brought Teddy Roosevelt, who during a stopover with his Rough Riders, declared Seville's log depot the most attractive he'd ever seen.

Once dubbed the "Tangerine Capital of the World," Seville evolved in a number of ways since the 1880's. The excellent quail hunting, the Seville Hotel, its town baseball team, and a tour boat called the Alma May were were sources of community pride.

In addition to the Lente family, names such as Prevatt, Harvey, Miller, Cowart, Robinson, Graham, Cade, Meyer, Causey, Morrison, Thigpen, Gordon, Flowers, Newman, Haynes, and Raulerson, figured in shaping the town.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, local folk historian
Producer: Rosa Meddaugh
Running time: 35 minutes 17 seconds

Back to top


Pierson, Florida: Fern Capital of the World

How many towns can claim to be named by a train conductor? In 1886, when the first train rolled in, this small town was still unnamed. The conductor of the train asked the first five men that he met for their names. When all five answered Pierson, he declared the town's name to be Piersonville.

Peter and Nels Pierson, and their three cousins had come to Florida in 1876, hoping to expand a fern growing business they had previously operated near Boston. Although they were accidentally responsible for the town's name, their business and fields (and the fields of other owners) were grown by purposeful design. They kept on growing until the town could rightfully claim to be the "Fern Capital of the World."

This recording takes through Pierson's early days, when citrus crops and commercial fishing competed with fern crops for leadership as the area's economic base. Old-time Pierson farmers, field hands, warehousemen, store and hotel owners, church congregations, teachers and students, athletic teams and musical groups beckon to us from over the decades.

We revisit many of the old family faces and names that were an integral part of Pierson history. Several generations of Piersons, Engstroms, Hagstroms, Bennetts, Swansons, Andersens, Jones, Ericksons, Merriams, Pledgers, Botts, Cades, Taylors, Carlisles, Petersons, and Smileys, to name a few, gaze out at us from the distant past.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, local Folk Historian
Producer: Rosa Meddaugh
Running time: 44 minutes 10 seconds

Back to top


Volusia County Fair: The 1st 100 Years

Circuses actually were the first type of entertainment to come to the area in approximately 1890. The first fair was held at the Aquatic Club on the west side of Blue Lake about 1914. the Fair Grounds on West New York Avenue, across from the DeLand Depot was built in 1924 and was in continuous use until the late 1930's and again for one year after World War II in 1954. The City then sold the property and the Fair was moved to the National Guard Armory on South Alabama Ave. for the years 1955, 56 and 57. It was held at the old Naval Hospital site in 1958 and 59. Its next stop was on McDonald Ave. at the airport in 1966 and 67. The first fair on Hwy. 44 was held in 1968 and has continued to grow in this location.

Back to top


Early Homes in DeLand

When northerners began to move to DeLand, they built homes similar to their places up North. They called their homes "winter cottages."

Many of these beautiful old homes have been torn down to make room for "progress." Those that remain are treasures that we should preserve for future generations.

These homes are mostly built of native "yellow pine"; base boards, door facings and built-in cabinets often were made of "curly pine." This wood was rare and this kind of lumber is no longer available. This is another reason to save these beautiful homes.

Back to top


DeBary, Florida

Historians cannot help but note the ironic fact that the city of DeBary is one of the area's youngest, a mere ten years, yet boasts the oldest standing domicile in West Volusia County; DeBary Hall. Part of the reason for DeBary's relatively slow ascent to incorporation is owed to its original creation by a single man, Frederick DeBary, and a total dominance by him and his family well into the 20th century. The DeBary clan, wealthy even by comparison with the robber barons of their era, invested so heavily in the land surrounding their sumptuous winter home that by the early 1900's, approximately 9,000 acres was in their use for either agricultural, hunting, or fishing purposes, or in support of their other area enterprises, not the least of which was the DeBary Merchant (steamship) Line.

The enclosed video, narrated by folk historian Bill Dreggors, takes us on a pictorial journey through DeBary's early days as several loose clusters of residential homes and shops; to be joined by early churches, bridges, highways and larger businesses, most notably the Florida Power generating plant. Many who thought they knew DeBary will come away with a greater appreciation of their city's growth after viewing the video.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, Local Folk Historian
Producer: Rosa Meddaugh
Running time: 45 minutes

Back to top


DeBary Hall

DeBary Hall looks too elegant to be a seasonal hunting and fishing lodge, yet Frederick DeBAry and his son Adolph built it specifically for that purpose in 1871. They and their well healed guests were able to lounge in the kind of luxury they were accustomed to whenever they returned from their outings on Lake Monroe, the St. Johns River and surrounding forest. The senior DeBary had plenty of money to invest in this winter home thanks to his thriving wine import business. In fact, he had enough left over to plant orange groves, pecan trees, on the surrounding acreage (up to 6,000) and even start up a bustling steamship business, the DeBary Merchant Line.

In the enclosed tape, folk historian Bill Dreggors describes some of the more unusual aspects of this area's oldest standing structure, including its ice house, caretaker's shack, its lightning rods, swimming pool (Florida's first), and even a private airplane strip and hangar. The same airplane shown in this tape crashed in 1941, causing Frederick's granddaughter's death and leading to family divestiture in DeBary Hall.  However, thanks to several decades of strident preservation efforts, we are now able to visit this fine architectural sample of a by-gone era. This tape will enable us to preview such a visit or serve as a keepsake.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, Local Folk Historian
Producer: Rosa Meddaugh
Running time: 32 minutes

Back to top


History of the DeLand Police Department

As Bill Dreggors tells it, DeLand's first department was a one man operation, a town marshal. Funding for the marshal nearly dried up until the shade tree tax refund was revoked.

Folk Historian Bill Dreggors traces the history of the Department with particular emphasis on the individual patrolmen and chiefs who managed our law enforcement from the 1920's to the present day. He also touches on the phasing in of modern police techniques such as motor cars, motorcycles, a two-way communications system, and interaction with the FBI.

By viewing this recording, we learn who was DeLand's best known motorcycle patrolman, who made a famous "mystery stew" and who was photographed in the act of controlling a wild turkey. Names such as Cosimini, Battles, Cooper, Dillard, Hays, Slaughter, Richardson, Dreggors, Heath, and Bibbey, to name a few, are given to the faces peering out from old Police Department photographs. Mr. Dreggors pays tribute to all that they done over the years to make DeLand such a peaceful community.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, Local Folk Historian
Producer: Rosa Meddaugh
Running time: 30 minutes

Back to top


Emporia, Florida

Though never a large community, Emporia enjoyed its own little boom period from the late 1880's through 1920's. Its prosperity was done partly to an influx of Northern tourists who stayed at the Emporia Hotel and (some) decided to build their own impressive two-story "painted houses." Emporia's other economic stimuli came from a a saw mill, a turpentine still, orange groves, a packing house, and cattle ranching. Some of the local agriculture consisted of subsistence farms.

Like so many early communities, Emporia featured a small school house, a small post office, and a small Baptist Church. Any unusual or new event would draw intense local interest. Such was the case when Emporia's first flush toilet was installed, inspiring school children to conduct "grasshopper swirl" demonstration.

Assisted by the inputs of John Turner, Maxine Turner, and Ethel Murphy, Bill Dreggors narrates this story.

Current day relatives of Emporia's pioneer families, named Richardson, Dillard, Roberts, Beers, DeLong, Wesson, Miners, Mozart, Ballard, Stone, Felton, and Wilson will hear their ancestors credited with helping build Volusia County.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, Local Folk Historian
Producer: Rosa Meddaugh
Running time: 22 minutes

Back to top


Barberville, Lungren, Volusia

As its original name "Midway" implies, Barberville has always been a crossroads, owing much of its early progress to the railroads, stage roads, and the St. John's River. From the time progress to the railroads, stage roads, and the St. John's River. From the time Mr. Barber opened his store in 1882, through the steamboat commerce out of Astor Landing, and with the opening of the Barberville Railroad Depot in 1886, transportation was a key to the town's growth. Inevitably, progress has changed the scenery of the town and its surrounding areas. Gone are the hand-operated river ferries. Gone are the Indian mounds whose shells were hauled away for surfacing county roads. Gone, also, is the Lake George lighthouse, burned down in 1971, but not before it hosted one of Florida's greatest murder mysteries.

Certain visionaries recognized the importance of preserving the town's rich heritage, and thus created the very popular site known as Barberville Pioneer Settlement. By visiting the Settlement, one can take a huge step back in time and experience the Barberville of the Nineteenth Century.

As they review this recording, old-timers and their descendants will recognize their faces smiling out from old home, work, church, and school photographs. Names connected with those faces include Dillard, Murphy, Clifton, Underhill, Seymour, Russell, Ward, Hunter, Long, Hatch, Rutledge, Beasley, Lemons, Richardson, Buckles, and Morrison to name a few.

A warm thank you to John and Maxine Turner and Ethel Murphy for their contributions to this video.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, Local Folk Historian
Producer: Rosa Meddaugh
Running time: 51 minutes, 2 seconds

Back to top


Faces Of DeLand (The Play)

By Larry Sands

The Cast
The Interviewer  
Larry Sands
Cyrenius Wright  
David Rigsby
Capt. John Rich  
Vann Rhodes
Clara Rich  
Pamela Rintz
Henry A. DeLand  
Bill Dreggors
John Forbes  
Pete Rougeux
Hettie Austin  
Andrea Finkle
C.P. Wilcox  
Jim Armstrong
John B. Stetson  
Gary Meadows
Fanny Burlingame  
Janet Bollum
Mayor David Rigsby  
Himself
Production Crew
Producer/Director  
Rene Sands
Researchers  
Bill Dreggors, Elysha Dunagan, Pat Nordman, Beverly Outlaw, Larry & Rene Sands
Stage Managers  
Paunny Brandt, Martha Desmond, Midge Ashley
Set Construction  
Felton Construction
Scenic Art  
Ralph Batten, Len Berroth
Lights  
Josh Rigsby
Stage Crew  
John Watson, Katie Keyser, Kim Sarich
Costume Coordinator  
Julie Flowers
Music Coordinator  
Jeffrey Sands
Theater Center Coordinators
Artistic Coordinator  
Darlene J. Lentz
Technical Supervisor  
Mike Keyser
Administrative Director  
Pattie S. Pardee
Box Office Manager  
Bonnie Keyser
Acknowledgments 


T.C.E. Rentals, Inc. (Larry and Carol Curran, Frank Phelan), Gibbs for Men, Seaside Music Theater
Mike Rushkin, Scott Price, LaVerda Felton, Jacki Cosimini, Alan Parker, Marty Wilson, Rebecca Wilson, Christopher Hayes, Larry Campbell, Tim Utting, Lynn Brandenburg, Carol McGauvran, Debbie Turner, Irene Johnson, Beverly Buzzeli, Sandy Walls, Carol McCormick
This production is licensed in part by ASCAP - the American Society of Composers, Authors & Publishers.


Back to top


Planes Over DeLand (1943-46)

By 1943, DeLand Naval Air Station was at full staff and was turning out SBD Squadrons weekly for the Pacific Fleet. Keeping these old planes flying was a compliment to the line chiefs and mechanics. Even then, they had crashes regularly. The drone of the plane engines over DeLand was constant, day and night.

Officers and sailors were on the streets of town and at the Athens Theater and the bowling alley with their dates every evening. It was a real boom time for local merchants.

The U.S.O. was located in the old Chamber of Commerce building on the S.W corner of New York and Florida Aves. This was a popular place for service men and the local girls.

The Catholic church had dances for servicemen weekly The residents did all they could to make the servicemen feel "at home." DeLand was booming!

Back to top


WWII - Navy Base Closes (1946)

The DeLand Naval Air Station had auxiliary bases in New Smyrna, Spruce Creek, Crescent City, Lake George, DeLeon Springs, and bombing targets near Pasley, Hawkinsville, and East of Lake Dias. New Smyrna refueled and rearmed planes practicing landings at Spruce Creek and target practicing over the ocean. The planes carried a 500 lb. bomb when they were over the ocean in case they spotted a German sub. They did bomb quite a few whales thinking they were subs. Lake Crescent and Lake George were used by the Naval Air Station in DeLand. DeLeon had two sailors stationed at the Springs to patrol Lake Woodruff. The College Arms Hotel was taken over by the Navy to be used by the armed guard personnel as a rest center. These men manned the guns on freightliners and tankers going all over the world. They were not recognized for any benefits until about forty years after the end of the war. their wives and girlfriends stayed at Mrs. Whitley's Boarding House across from the hotel. The war ended and the base closed on March 15, 1946. the Base was then turned over to the City of DeLand.

Back to top


Navy Lands in DeLand (1942)

On November 11, 1942, the DeLand Naval Air Station officially opened after several months of land acquisition and building construction. Capt. Tom Turner, first base commander, officiated. A band had not been formed so the DeLand High School band played for the opening of the base.

The first planes were "Venturas." They were not here for training, but were patrolling the coast of Florida looking for German submarines.

When the "SBD" dive bombers began to arrive, along with pilots and crew members, the "Venturas" were reassigned to Brazil for patrol duty.

The "SBDs" were planes that were being replaced in the Pacific fleet. It was the "SBD" that sank the four Japanese carriers at the Battle of Midway.

Many of DeLand's citizens were employed at the base and were paid wages that were great coming out of the depression.

Back to top


DeLand in the '50s: The War Boom

The 1950's saw new items in the stores. People had saved their money during the war and were ready to spend it. Throw out the old antique furniture and get new chrome and plastic. The first subdivision since the 20s and shopping centers were built. G.I. loans were available and veterans took advantage of them. The City of DeLand gave free lots to any veterans living in the city with the stipulation that they had to build on them within one year.

The economy slowed in the latter part of the 50's and every thing stayed the same for awhile.

Back to top


DeLand in the '60s and '70s

The economy began to pick up in the 60's and DeLand again showed new growth and more new shopping centers. The downtown business district showed a drastic change; grocery stores moved out to the shopping centers, as well as some of the retail businesses. Main street would not recover until the 1990's. Home construction was now supervised by new county and city departments that were created for buildings permits. Inspectors were hired to check all work. Prior to this, you could build whatever-wherever. As you look back at life in the 1900's and compare it to today, there were more changes in this past century, than in all the previous years combined. Wonder what the next 100 years will bring?

Back to top


John B. Stetson in DeLand, Florida

Mr. Stetson came to DeLand in 1886 to escape the cold winters in Philadelphia. His friend, Henry DeLand, told him about this wonderful area. Stetson purchased several hundred acres of land, planted orange groves, built an electric plant, an ice plant, and put in a water system West of DeLand. His groves froze in the 1894-95 freezes and he built wood slat houses over them so they would never freeze again.

His electric plant was the first in Florida and the three street lights were the first in Florida. The generator he used was the fourth one made by Edison.

Back to top


DeLand During the Depression

World War I was over, people had money to spend and the economy boomed.

Prohibition was passed and alcohol dried up, until the boot leggers got geared up. Gangsters, Rum Runners, Bath Tub Gin, Moonshine, and Home Brew was the order of the day. Land prices in Florida went out of site. In Miami, land was going up to $10,000 a front foot. It all ended in 1926, when a severe hurricane hit Miami. In 1928, the banks closed and the entire county was caught up in a deep depression. DeLand was no exception, hard times hit here also.

Back to top


DeLand in the '20s: The Boom Days

The 1930's were tough years, financially. Laborers, if they could find a job, were paid $1.00 per day. These were 10 to 12 hour days, Monday through Saturday. Groceries were cheap, but most people had a garden, chickens, a pig, and some lucky ones even had a milk cow. Boys and girls both went to school bare footed to save money. When Dave Sholts, of Daytona Beach, was elected governor he legalized slot machines and the profits paid for school books so parents did not have to any more. After 4 years, slot machines were removed but books remained free. Even if we were poor, most everyone else was, so we did not know it. It was a really wonderful time to grow up here. During the war years (1940's) DeLand bustled with the Navy boat works and glider factory. This will be highlighted in another video.

Back to top


DeLand: As You Remember It ('40s)

A video of DeLand and the close surrounding area during the war years of the 40's, the town where you grew up or spent some of your young years...
the way it was then and never will be again...
the changes brought on by the war that touched us at our very doorsteps...
the things you did, the places you went, the people you knew...

This brand new video will let you view the old town again as it was "THEN"... step back in time for an hour or so... let your mind wander back to younger, less hectic, more innocent days... to DELAND -- as you can remember it!

Back to top


DeLand: The WWI Era

From 1900 to 1920 DeLand experienced slow but steady growth. The County Jail was built on West New York Avenue across from the Court House. When a person was sentenced to hang, the hanging was carried out in that county. Here it took place in the rear of the jail. A new Post Office was built in 1917 on the northeast corner of Indiana and Florida Avenues. World War I ended in 1918 with six local men killed. Officers were trained at Stetson University's ROTC program to serve in WWI. The "Downtown" had only one wood building left by 1920.

Downtown was changing with new construction. Everything was located downtown. There were no shopping centers!!

Back to top


DeLand: The Years 1890-1920

This thirty year period was momentous in the changes it brought. DeLand continued to grow both in its downtown area, as well as, in population. The telephone and electric were becoming more accessible to the households in the area. DeLand experienced the worst freezes in it's short history, in 1894 and in 1895. It was about 10 years before the groves made a comeback. Mr. Stetson died in 1906 and Henry DeLand died in 1908. Woodland Boulevard was bricked in 1917. Part of the road to New Smyrna Beach bricked in 1919 after World War I.

Back to top


The Founding of DeLand

Henry, A. DeLand arrived in Central Florida on April 7, 1876, and made his first land purchase the next day. Describing the area as the most beautiful place he had ever seen, he purchased more land and laid out a city. The few settlers who were living in the area met and named the city for him, electing the first city officials in 1882.

Henry DeLand founded the "Academy" (later to become Stetson University) in 1883. He made DeLand a center of culture and learning and called it "the Athens of Florida."

Back to top


St. Johns River: The Steamboat Era

In 1886 settlers began coming to central Florida to homestead government property and by the 1880's, tourists, traveling mostly by steamboat on the St. Johns River, had found Florida. The 1870's and 80's were the "Honeymoon Years" of the steamboats. During this time, it was said that you could stand on the deck of a steamboat and see another one anytime of the day or night.

The coming of the train to central Florida in 1886 would end the steamboat era by the early 1930's.

Visit these fascinating years of the St. Johns and the steamships that helped build Florida.

Back to top


Lue Gim Gong: The Citrus Wizard

Lue Gim Gong came to DeLand, Florida, in 1888. He died here in 1925 and is buried in Oakdale Cemetery.

His Lue Gim Gong Orange was an early fruit that ripened in September, but it could hang on the tree for four years and still be good. This orange won him the Silver Wilder Medal from the Department of Agriculture in 1911 - the only time it was ever given for citrus.

He conducted church services every Sunday in his orange grove. Everyone was invited and many came.

Learn more about this quiet and gentle man who was a true citrus wizard.

Back to top


History of DeLeon Springs

It is said that Ponce DeLeon came to Florida in search of the "Fountain of Youth." It is also said that Spanish records show that he came up a large river that flowed to the north (St. Johns). He passed through a very large lake (Lake George) and a few miles later came to another lake (Lake Dexter). A short stream connected it (Tick Island Run) with another large lake (Lake Woodruff). Flowing into this lake on the north side was a large clear stream (Spring Garden Run). He followed it to its source, and he found at least two springs (DeLeon Springs). He drank eagerly of the water, but alas he grew no younger and another dream had vanished.

Back to top


Ghost Towns of the St. Johns

St. Francis (Old Town), Crows Bluff, and Hawkinsville were located on the west bank of the St. Johns River, four miles west of DeLand.

St. Francis is 116 miles south of Jacksonville, Crows Bluff, 119 miles, and Hawkinsville, 121 miles. Hawkinsville was granted a post office on April 26, 1858. Discontinued on Feb. 2, 1869. Regranted Sept. 23, 1872. It was then moved to Crows Bluff on Aug. 23, 1888 and discontinued on May 13, 1931. St. Francis was granted a post office on March 15, 1888 and discontinued on Oct. 15, 1909.

These important river towns served the steamboat traffic in these early years. But, when the train came to Central Florida from Jacksonville in 1886, taking the commerce from the steamboat lines, these towns began to die, and in a few years they became "ghost towns" that hold many great stories of Florida's early beginnings.

Back to top


Florida's Giants: The Bald Cypress

Step Back In Time -- when the Bald Cypress stood sentinel on the banks of the St. John's River.

The Bald Cypress, reaching heights up to 150 feet and a diameter of 25 feet, grew from Delaware to Florida, over to Texas and up the Mississippi River to Illinois.

Lumbermen began to harvest the cypress, in earnest, in the 1860's.

Cypress is a hardy wood, resistant to insects and rot... used for many purposes, including water tanks for the railroads.

Bill Dreggors gives us a rare look into this important time in the history of Florida.

Back to top


Blue Spring: Gem of the St. Johns

Blue Spring is indeed the "GEM" of the St. Johns River. It has been occupied for more than 2000 years. First by the Mayaca Indians, then the Seminoles, and in the 1840's, the first white settlers.

It's character has changed very little since Louis Thursby built his home on the shell midden in 1872.

Blue Spring is now a state park of some 2800 acres and the home of the West Indies manatee. It is the only spring on the St. Johns where they winter in large numbers.

Special? Yes, Indeed!!

Back to top


History is Alive

Join fourth-graders, Tom and Anna as a seemingly ordinary classroom lesson turns into an adventure in time travel! Local historian, Bill Dreggors, dons the garb and persona of the founding father of the City of DeLand, Henry Addison DeLand, and takes the children on a journey to some of the historic buildings and places that have played an important role in Volusia County's past.

Cast

Tom: Thomas Brett
Anna: Anna Christina Randolph
Timucuan Indian: Reese Moore
Narrator/Henry Addison DeLand: William J. Dreggors, Jr.

Running time approximately 15 minutes.
Written, produced and directed by Senta Goudy.
Editing and technical production by Beachwood Productions, Inc.
Videography by Volusia County Community Information Division.

Produced by the Volusia County Historic Preservation Board with assistance from the Volusia County Community Information Division. This project has been financed in part with historic preservation grant assistance provided by the National Park Service, United States Department of the Interior, administered through the Bureau of Historic Preservation, Florida Department of State, assisted by the Florida Historic Preservation Advisory Council.

Back to top


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF DELAND

The histories of DeLand and its First Baptist Church have been intertwined from the very start. Thanks to a lifelong familiarity with both, Bill Dreggors is able to take us back to the first services held in an open pine forest, then DeLand's first school house, and then on to the three different church structures; each providing the space needed to accommodate the church's ever-growing membership.

A number of old photographs and slides (some of these literally rescued from the trash collector) are used to illustrate Dreggor's narrative as he describes each phase of the church's history. Pictures from decades past will take many on a trip back to their own childhood and young adulthood. They will see themselves participating in services, choirs, Sunday school classes, construction projects, and even Valentine Day parties.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, Folk Historian
Producer: Rosa Meddaugh
Running time: 40 minutes
Copyright 2005


Back to top


DELAND REVISITED

Bill Dreggors, Janet Bollun, dressed as Henry DeLand and Helen DeLand, Heritage Day, circa 1990, strolling in downtown DeLand, up to DeLand Hall, and met the president at Stetson University.


Back to top


EARLY RECREATION IN DELAND, FLORIDA PART I

Folk historian Bill Dreggors takes us on a nostalgic trip through several eras of recreation in West Volusia County. In the late 19th century, the main attraction was our climate and the abundant opportunities for fishing and hunting. Then, as the new (20th) century dawned, the Blue Lake Aquatic Club became the preferred gathering place, not only for the water sports, but also for those fortunate enough to belong to the Blue Lake Automobile Club.

From World War I through the 1940's the DeLand Band Shell hosted a wide variety of entertainment events. High on that list were concerts by our own municipal band and the "Talent Night" competition. The Florida Cowboys were also among the more popular musical groups. Dreggors also tells how DeLand's first movie houses: the Athens, the Dreka, and the Washington served the dual roles as entertainment palaces for adults and baby sitters for their children.

Dreggors explains how throughout the early decades, outdoor recreation reigned supreme. Shuffle boards, horseshoe pits, tennis courts, golf courses, and checker boards were found in a variety of places, then kept relocating right up to the current day. A zoo as part of a trailer park; power boat racing on a city lake; a city dump reconfigured as a golf course; each story entertains the modern day viewer nearly as much as we were originally entertained "back in the day".

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, local folk historian
Produced by: Roasa Meddaugh
Running Time: 53 minutes, 10 seconds
Copyright 2005


Back to top


EARLY RECREATION IN DELAND, FLORIDA PART II

A professional baseball team from DeLand? Car races at the old fair grounds? Stetson University hosting Florida State University in football game? Babe Ruth's wife dedicating a youth league? A water park? Power boat racing in a weekly basis? Bicycle clubs and dog and pony shows? That's right. All these events were important attractions for our leisure pursuits from the early 1900's through the 1950's. Folk historian Bill Dreggors helps us revisit these old events as only he can.

Mr. Dreggors supplies many of the names of those who smile at us from their respective eras of DeLand pastimes ...names such as "Raw Meat" Rogers, "Uncle Bill" Page, "Frenchy" Norega, Bill Conrad, the DeLand Red Hats, and several amateur players who became town leaders later in their life. Mr. Dreggors also explains how community events drew sizable turnouts in the days before television and the shopping malls. Certain organizations also attracted large numbers of local enthusiasts: the American Legion, VFW, Boy Scouts, Sea Scouts, and the Royal Order of the Moose to name a few. Some of these pursuits and organizations have faded or disappeared altogether. Some are still growing. Whichever the case, their origins and highlights are competently chronicled herein.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, local folk historian
Produced by: Rosa Meddaugh|
Running Time: 50 minutes
Copyright 2005


Back to top



BURT'S HOLDING
 

F.N. Burt's story has several elements similar to that of Henry DeLand. Burt was already a wealthy man when he came to the DeLeon Springs area of Buffalo, NY in 1912. He was also interested in real estate development. Burt's story diverges from DeLand's after that. For one thing, he diversified; getting into agricultural and leisure enterprises on his own. For another, Burt actually became richer, rather than busted, as a result of his investments.

After unloading his auto from the train, Burt proceeded in invest an entire suitcase full of cash. When he was finished, he had developed a huge agricultural complex which featured sugar cane, cotton, water melons, corn, cattle, and even cactus. His largest cluster of live stock stables and feed barns became Spring Garden Ranch, where nowadays we can see future harness champions work out during their off season.

Burt's real estate venture, Burwyn Park, had his personal whimsical touches of Japanese and frontier American entrance arches. He also tried his hand at amusement parks. Burt's Park was a serious competitor with DeLeon Spring Park. It became a favorite hangout for Navy personnel during World War II.

Bill Dreggors spins this yarn by drawing on his own encyclopedic knowledge of the area. He illustrates this video with a collection of vintage photos and even relies on his personnel family history for certain details. It seems that Dreggor's own father was a close friend of the Burt family. Furthermore, one of Burt's key personnel was a certain Ralph Driggers, another member of the same Dreggors clan. How did a vast forest of pine become the areas known as Burwyn Park,Spring Garden Ranch, and South Hill Farm? It's all on the inside.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, local folk historian
Produced by: Rosa Meddaugh|
Running Time: 40 minutes


Back to top


GLENWOOD, FLORIDA

Bill Dreggors takes us on yet another time trip to Old Volusia. This tour goes to Glenwood and Highland Park. We may have thought we knew these neighborhoods, but Dreggors helps us to understand how drastically they have changed since the 1880's.

With Dreggors as out guide, and vintage photos as our illustration, we go back to Lue Gim Gong's old haunts. We stay overnight at the Highland Park House, then, for good measure, check into the Glenwood House, two "full service" hotels of a bye-gone era. We also sit in a one room school house which happened to be financed by an atheist. you can easily imagine what happens when out benefactor catches us reciting the Lords Prayer! We travel down the original Grand Avenue, a divided boulevard even then, yet unpaved, then covered with shells and graced with an overhead with an overhead canopy of pine trees draped in moss.

As for the pastimes enjoyed by the original settlers, we go to Robert's Fish Camp, a bicycle ride to neighboring towns, and on an outing with the Glenwood Tennis Camp. We also visit a celery farm, back in the days when produce customers insisted on pure white celery, and the growers found a way to comply.

Let's meet the Hazens, Wooleys, Woods, Jones, Conrads, and Van Cleefs. These were just some of the folk who settled these festinating and ever evolving neighborhood of Glenwood and Highland Park.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, local folk historian
Produced by: Rosa Meddaugh|
Running Time: 35 minutes


Back to top


ORANGE CITY, FLORIDA


Orange City's name was inspired by its previous economic dependence on the intense plating, harvesting, and marketing of oranges. In this respect, "Orange City" story in typical of many Central Florida municipalities. However, folk historian, Bill Dreggors gives us an insight to the twists of history that have given Orange City its own unique character.

Dreggors takes us through the distinct, yet overlapping phases of Orange City's history. At first it was mostly a high pine forest, impressing Henry DeLand with its beauty when he came through it in 1876. It was already the type of well-structured town that Mr. DeLand would later found. The co-founder of Orange City were Seth French and Norman Levitt. They sold raw acreage, promoted development, and in general, capitalized on the "Orange Fever".

From W.W. West General Store to a wooden railroad to the little bank that refused to fail Orange City's legacy unfolds before our eyes.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, local folk historian
Produced by: Rosa Meddaugh|
Running Time: 45 minutes
Copyright 2004


Back to top


Orange City, Florida Hotels, Churches, Schools, Trains, People

What makes up a small town? In this video you will see the heart and soul of one small town - Orange City, Florida. Bill Dreggors gives us insight to the people and places that gave Orange City its own unique character.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, Local Folk Historian
Producer: Rosa Meddaugh
Running time: 53 minutes
Copyright 2004

Back to top


Hontoon Island

The first significant "modern" development on Hontoon Island was the steamboat landing at Cabbage Bluff. Cargo was off-loaded and stored in a small cluster of buildings and onto Mr. Bond's DeLand/Hontoon railroad. A shuttle boat, the Cherokee, handled other passenger and cargo needs.

Orange groves prevailed for awhile, then were decimated by the frosts. Mr. Love's farm thrived thanks to the rich soil and hos cabbage, corn, and celery crops. The Deanbury Dairy farm also prospered for years. The need for road building materials led to digging up the large shell mounds on Hontoon. It also led to perhaps the largest Indian artifact find (including extremely rare totem poles) in the United States.

Historian Bill Dreggor narrates this picture tour of Hontoon. He tells of the impact that people named Dreka, Strong, Botts, Moore, Perkins, and Connell had on its history. He guides us around the Snake River, Shell Cheek, Mud Lake, and Lake Beresford. With Mr. Dreggors' help, we see how Hontoon eventually hosted a state park, a yacht club, and residential development.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, Local Folk Historian
Producer: Rosa Meddaugh
Running time: 30minutes
Copyright 2006

Back to top


Methodist Children's Home Enterprise, Florida

In this video, Bill Dreggors takes us back to the old Methodist Orphanage in Enterprise. He explains how it was started by a concerned elderly lady known as Mother Brooks who, at the turn of the twentieth century, decided to convert her oversized house into a refuge for homeless children. The Methodist Church soon became her generous partner, and pitched in to help the facility grow and even prosper.

Thanks to a collection of old photographs, we can see how the Orphanage children raised chickens, pigs, dairy cattle, vegetables, and citrus products. They also learned trades such as carpentry, printing, and barbering, attended the local grade school, and later, DeLand High School. They also got to enjoy one of the area's better playgrounds and swimming pool. Dreggors shares with us his personal experiences with the Orphanage and the lifelong friendships he forged with some of its youngsters. To quote one of his old pals, "I got a good start in life there. It wasn't bad; not bad at all."

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, Local Folk Historian
Producer: Rosa Meddaugh
Running time: 18 minutes
Copyright 2006

Back to top


Stone Island, Osteen, Saulsville, and Lake Ashby

In this illustrated narrative, Bill Dreggors shows us some nearly forgotten aspects of Central Florida settlements. We visit old Stone Island, back when both vegetable farms and jewelry production thrived therein. We also get to meet the founder of Osteen, its early schools, churches, post office, and railroad depot. We learn the contributions made by Sam Brooks, Herbert Bond, and Ted Hunter. In the Lemon Bluff segment, we learn how an enterprising settler helped a confederate leader escape into exile. We also learn why and how the Calkins Electric family first moved into this region. It's all on the inside.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, Local Folk Historian
Producer: Rosa Meddaugh
Running time: 30 minutes
Copyright 2006

Back to top


Enterprise Florida

Bill Dreggors entertains and enlightens us with this pictorial review of one of Volusia County's oldest settlements. It's a story with enough twists and turns to make up a historical trivia quiz. Some of the questions in such a quiz would be:

  1. Which Central Florida town served as a destination resort over 100 years before Disney World was developed?
  2. Which town had, at various times, been the seat for three different countries? (Mosquito, Orange, and Volusia)
  3. President Grant spent the night at a hotel called Brock House in which Central Florida town?
  4. Which town changed its name twice and its location once?
  5. Name the town which served as the first terminus for for steam boat transportation to and from Jacksonville?

The correct answer is always "Enterprise", and Mr. Dreggors can be counted upon to back up the answer with a rich treasure-trove of facts, fables, and photographs. Once we have viewed this production, we should all be able to "Ace" such a quiz.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, Local Folk Historian
Producer: Rosa Meddaugh
Running time: 50 minutes
Copyright 2006

Back to top


Lake Beresford

Bill Dreggors narrates a pictorial journey back to visit the first settlers of Beresford, starting with Andrew Henderson Alexander. The Alexander/Beresford docks, combined with early citrus farming, attracted a cluster of homes, Mr. Felt's store, a post office, and eventually a grand social pavilion. Mr. Dreggors relates how both the Beresford docks and the Deerfoot Landing became routine stopovers for the steam ships which once served as Volusia County's main link to the outside world. We are treated to views of the Port of Jacksonville, the Frederick DeBary, and the Osceola at their zenith, before they were replaced by railroads and overland trucks. We see how horses, mules, and oxen also figured prominently in the area's early commerce.

Recreational activities in old Beresford and Stark are also treated: swimming, fishing, boat tours, boat racing, and even Indian artifact collecting are discussed and shown. Dreggors explains how he would catch a "shiner" early in the morning; then use it to land an 8 to 10 pound bass later the same day.

We get not only the vintage images of docks, packing houses, mansions, rail depots, ships, and hyacinth-covered creeks, but also the family names of settlers who decided to stay awhile. One of the more haunting images is that of an abandoned mansion built by a Georgia gentleman named Captain Stark.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, Local Folk Historian
Producer: Rosa Meddaugh
Running time: 30 minutes
Copyright 2006

Back to top


DeLeon Springs

Bill Dreggors narrates an evocative collection of yellowing photographs. They depict DeLeon Springs as it evolved from a vast forest of pine trees into a bustling agricultural, then a tourist junction where some of our earliest rails, roads, and rivers crossed each other.

Dreggors describes the customary listing of early farms, ranches, churches, schools, restaurants, general stores, tourist cabins, and hotels most notable, the DeSoto House) in the folksy style we have come to expect. He also comments on groupings of people; small numbers at first, then growing as the decades roll by. These faces smiling at us from yesteryear have familiar family names such as bert, Clifton, Jones, Hunter, McInnis, Norris, rich, Sorenson, St. Augustine, Tatum, and Taylor.

Where were huge quantities of sea shell beds mined and how were they used? How closely did the Clifton Ranch's hired hands resemble cowboys from the old West? Who played baseball on the old DeLeon Springs team? What happened to its cargo of fruit when a train jumped its tracks? Who was the grizzled Civil War veteran who volunteered to fight again when the U.S. got into World War I? Answers to these and other tantalizing questions are contained within. Enjoy.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, Local Folk Historian
Producer: Rosa Meddaugh
Running time: 50 minutes

Back to top


Sawmills in Old Florida

How did Lumbering Operation change central Florida? Bill Dreggors gives us a through explanation and he illustrates it with rare photographs taken in the 19th and early 20th centuries. One of the changes was the landscape itself: The vista which so impressed Henry DeLand, that f unlimited primeval pine forests, had been reduced to millions of stumps, run down camps, and an occasional sawdust mound by the 1940's.

Dreggors shows how lumber mills ranged in size from the little "coffee pot" mill up to a virutral facory/town, replete with railroad spurs and miltiple kilns. He also explains the co-dependency of the ;umber business with transportation. We see tree carts, mule teams, owen teams, "skidders", river floats and both the coal fired and "pufferbelly" railroad engines. From a detailed description of the two-men crosscut saw up to a serveyof the dozen of mills dotting the landscape around all of central and northern florida, we are taken back ti the time when the Florida economy consisted of three major sectors: citrus, turnpentine, and lumber.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, Local Folk Historian
Producer: Rosa Meddaugh
Running time: 30 minutes
Copyright 2007

Back to top


Turpentining in Old Florida

Unlike the citrus industry, which still has a dwinling presence in our nearby groves, central Florida's turpentine operations have so throughtly disappeared that one is hard pressed to find even the smallest trace of its once great influence. Folk historian Bill Dreggors tells us how at its height, turpentine production sprawled over many thousand of acres around DeLand, Orange City, DeLeon Springs, the Old Daytona Road, Lake Helen, and Barberville. He also gives us a few clues on how to spot the subtle traces of this once booming activity: scars on old pin trees, the tell-tale "cats face" markings on trees, what the "Hurley cup" looks like and how it was used, exatly how the highly-skilled workers would "hack" the trees at specific times during the year.

DCare to know why turpentine warehouses where called "Naval stores"? Why the demand for turpentine took a drastic down turn in the 40's and 50's? Where you sould go in order to inspect the sole remiaining turpentine still in central Florida?Want to know how local and county police were, in effect, turpentine operators' best local supplies? The interdependent relationship between saw mill owners and turpentine operators? The answer to these questions and more are on the inside.

Narrator: Bill Dreggors, Local Folk Historian
Producer: Rosa Meddaugh
Running time: 40 minutes
Copyright 2007

Back to top


Cummer & Sons Cypress Logging (1946-1958)

This is raw footage done on 8mm film and the last part is from a video film. The quality is poor but we wanted to save this historic period in the history of cypress logging.

Back to top



Books

By the Light of the Lighter Pine: Volumes One & Two
by William H. Good with Illustrations by Gene Packwood
A “Cracker” Collection of short stories in a softcover book about Natural Florida in two volumes.

($15.95, plus tax)

Back to top


A Century of West Volusia County: 1860­1960
by William “Bill” Dreggors and John Stephen Hess
A coffee table size hardcover collection of 800 photographs with captions depicting the people, places, events and buildings of our past, with an introduction by Sidney Johnston, covering area historical societies and their preservation efforts.


($50.00, plus tax)

Back to top


Civil War Trivia
by Edward F. Williams III
A softcover book that compiles lesser-known facts of those who know little about the war, as well as those who consider themselves experts on the subject. An informative book of facts you have probably never heard about the Civil War.

($7.99, plus tax)

Back to top


Classic Cracker
by Ronald W. Haase
A softcover book about Florida’s wood-frame vernacular architecture.


($14.95, plus tax)

Back to top


Cracker: The Cracker Culture in Florida History
by Dana Ste.Claire
This softcover book is part anthology, part anthropology, part history, part folklore - and it celebrates Florida’s rich and diverse Cracker heritage.


($19.95, plus tax)

Back to top


The Cracker Kitchen
by Janis Owens
This compelling hardcover cookbook incorporates 150 recipes from over twenty different menus, and offers a full year’s worth of eating and rejoicing, from spring’s Easter Dinner to summer’s Fish Fries, fall’s Tailgate Parties, and winter’s In Celebration of Soul, honoring Martin Luther King, Jr.


($24.95, plus tax)

Back to top


Crow's Bluff/Enterprise/Osteen/Sorrento: 1883­1900
A spiral-fastened softcover book of reproductions of miscellaneous Florida Times-Union newspaper articles covering the towns of Crow's Bluff, Enterprise, Osteen and Sorrento, Florida.


($20.00, plus tax)

Back to top


Don’t Tell Mother
by Edwin N. Ferdon, Sr.
A spiral-fastened softcover book giving an autobiographical account of two young boys’ lives in DeLand at the turn of the century. The manuscript was found by his great-niece, still in the typewriter that he had typed it on, and sent to the DeLand House Museum. It is an informative look at the life of children in early DeLand.


($25.00, plus tax)

Back to top


Echoes of Yesterday
by Louise Ball Caccamise
A hardcover book of the history of the DeLand Public Library: 1912-1995.

($20.00, plus tax)

Back to top


A Field Guide to DeLand Buildings
Edited by Jackie Kersh
A spiral-fastened softcover book field guide to DeLand buildings that will help you identify and place the city’s buildings in historic and architectural context, with many photographs from the West Volusia Historical Society photo collection by Thomas J. Walker and Jackie Kersh
.

($25.00, plus tax)

Back to top


First Coast Steamboat Days
by Edward A. Mueller
A pamphlet about the history of travel by steamboats from Georgia and South Carolina to Northeast Florida during the past century.

($30.00, plus tax)

Back to top


Florida: Beauties of the East Coast
Text by Mrs. H. K. Ingram
A hardcover book featuring a collection of photographs of the historic byways of Florida.

($7.50, plus tax)

Back to top


Florida Cracker Cooking
Edited by Nancy Clark
This softcover cookbook not only gives you mouthwatering dishes to try, but it also gives fascinating facts and information about DeLand and Florida history. A favorite!

($5.00, plus tax)

Back to top


Florida History from the Highways
by Douglas Waitley
A paperback that is written with an engaging style containing a wealth of historical photographs. The author invites you to explore this extraordinary state’s rich past while enjoying its natural beauty.

($18.95 plus tax)

Back to top


Florida Place Names
by Allen Morris
Joan Perry Morris, Photo Editor
A 291-page hardcover book that chronicles the origin and meaning of the name of every county and most incorporated cities throughout the State of Florida. It paints a rich historical portrait of the state, and reveals the dreams, memories and sense of humor of Floridians of that era.

($21.95 plus tax)

Back to top


Get Your Feet Wet: From Palatka to the Atlantic Ocean
Published by the St. Johns Riverkeeper
This paperback guidebook edition covers the northern portion (lower section) of the St. Johns River from Palatka to the mouth near Mayport.

($19.99 plus tax)

Back to top


Gift of the Unicorn: The Story of Lue Gim Gong, Florida’s Citrus Wizard
by Virginia Aronson
This hardcover book is the story of Florida’s “Citrus Wizard,” an immigrant boy from China who became a brilliant man and blessed the world with his horticultural gifts.

($11.95 plus tax)

Back to top


Gingerbread Jack­in­the­Box
by Sally Landis Bohon
A collection of recipes in softcover concerning gingerbread pieces, with assembly instruction for the Jack-in-the-Box.

($2.00 plus tax)

Back to top


Great Houses of Florida
by Beth Dunlop and Joanna Lombard
Photographs by Steven Brooks
This beautiful coffee table size hardcover book presents forty of the grandest and most intriguing historical homes of the State, including John and Mabel Ringling’s fabulous Venetian palazzo in Sarasota, James Deering’s spectacular Italiante villa Vizcaya in Miami, the Audubon and Earnest Hemingway’s house in Key West, the Henry A. DeLand House Museum and the John B. Stetson home in DeLand.

($55.00 plus tax)

Back to top


Green Thumbs in the Kitchen
Copyrighted by Green Thumb, Inc.
From the family tables of homesteads, farms and reservations, to the potluck suppers and church socials in their towns and villages, the people of Green Thumb proudly preserve a taste of their America in this hardcover book. Rural America Green Thumb older workers share their talents in community service jobs all across the land, and in this book, they share their favorite recipes.

($10.00 plus tax)

Back to top


Guns of the Palmetto Plains: A Cracker Western
by Rick Tonyan
A hardcover book about many “rip-roaring” adventures set in frontier Florida, complete with crackling action and authentic historical details written by one of Florida’s most well known writers on “crackers.”

($16.95 plus tax)

Back to top


A Historical & Description of Volusia County& Its Towns and Settlements
Printed and Published by Order of the County Commissioners
A pamphlet chronicling the facsimile of the 1885 Edition of the Byways of Florida Series for Florida’s Sub-Tropical Year, 1888.

(15.00 plus tax)

Back to top


Historical Highlights of Volusia County
by T. E. Fitzgerald
A pamphlet about the history of one of the most historical counties in the United States.

(5.00 plus tax)

Back to top


Historic Homes of Florida: Second Edition
by Laura Stewart & Susanne Hupp
A fascinating hardcover book that tells the human side of history in this survey of restored residences. The stories are intertwined with those of their owners in a domestic history of Florida from the days of the Spanish occupation to the Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings House in Cross Creek, Vizcaya in Miami, and former President Harry S. Truman’s “Little White House” in Key West.

(18.95 plus tax)

Back to top


The History of New Smyrna
by Gary Luther with Photographs by E.G. Harris, 1890
A paperback book with over 160 rare photographs, engravings and maps of New Smyrna Beach, one of the oldest settlements in East Florida.

(15.00 plus tax)

Back to top


Hot Sand and Sandspurs: The Bill Dreggors Story
by William Dreggors, Jr.
Edited by Elysha Dunagan
This softcover autobiography by William “Bill” Dreggors, widely known as "Central
Florida's most recognized and favorite 'Florida Cracker,'” is told by the author himself, outlining many real and comedic incidents. If you are looking to read scholarly history that is grammatically perfect, this is NOT the book for you! If you are, however, looking to read the stories and hi-jinks of a fourth generation cracker, then you have found the right book.

(15.00 plus tax)

Back to top


Images of America: Barbervivlle
by Benjamin D. Brotemartkle
A paperback book that celebrates the history of Barberville, Florida, using archival photographs, and presents the town’s distinctive stories from the past that shape the character of the community today.

(19.99 plus tax)

Back to top


Images of America: DeLand
by Maggie Smith Hall
A paperback book that celebrates the history of DeLand, Florida, using archival
photographs, and presents the town’s distinctive stories from the past that shape the
character of the community today.

(21.99 plus tax)

Back to top


Images of America: Palm Coast
by Arthur E. Dyck
A paperback book that celebrates the history of Palm Coast, Florida, using archival photographs, and presents the town’s distinctive stories from the past that shape the character of the community today.

(19.99 plus tax)

Back to top


Merchants & Miners Transportation Co.: The Queen of Sea Routes
by Edward A. Mueller
A hardcover book that chronicles the fortunes and occasional misfortunes of The Merchants and Miners Transportation Co. (known widely and affectionately as “The M&M”), which connectedhe U.S. from 1852, until regular passenger and freight service was suspended upon the nation’s entry into WW II.

(37.50 plus tax)

Back to top


Minutes and Memorials of the Old Settlers of DeLand, Florida: 1882­1926
by Louise Ball Caccamise
Transcribed and written in a format for book publication by the librarian and former president of the West Volusia Historical Society, this spiral-fastened softcover book is based on the Minutes of the Old Settlers of DeLand that were originally written and worded beautifully by Hettie Austin, secretary of the Old Settlers Club. It also includes historic photographs and detailed memorials of the early settlers who composed this group.

(25.00 plus tax)

Back to top


The Odyssey of an American School System:
Volusia County Schools – 1854 to 2000
Patricia Callan Langlotz, Ed.D, Principal Writer & Researcher
A softcover book consisting of 246 pages outlining the history of the county’s
educational system.

(3.00 plus tax)

Back to top


Old Town By the Sea
by Bo Poertner
A hardcover book featuring the pictorial history of New Smyrna Beach, Florida.

(35.00 plus tax)

Back to top


One Pot Dinners
by Willa Cook
If you like to cook, this softcover cookbook offers a wholesome alternative that can help your food budget, and lighten your kitchen work.

(15.00 plus tax)

Back to top


Our Story of Orange City, Florida
Edited by Joan J. LaFleur
A fourth edition of a hardcover book in the series, which draws heavily from the previous editions of Our Story so that the wonderful early memories can come back into print. This edition incorporates new material about the early days of, about the middle years (1920s-1970s), and the more recent years (1975-1999), maintaining the “down home” style of the earlier editions.

(35.00 plus tax)

Back to top


The Parce Letters: Voices From the Past
by Gerri Giovanelli Bauer
This spiral-fastened softcover book features a collection of 19th century letters by DeLand pioneers, J.Y. Parce and Lucy Mead Parce, and written recollections of life in early DeLand by one of their sons, Girard Parce.

(20.00 plus tax)

Back to top


The Savannah Line: The Ocean Steamship Co. of Savannah, Georgia
by Edward A. Mueller
The Savannah Line was chartered in 1872 to carry passengers and freight between Savannah and New York. The Ocean Steamship Co. of Savannah was the only coastwise company with headquarters in the South (hardcover)
.

(29.50 plus tax)

Back to top


Sonnet Variations: Poets Fun With Forms
Robert S. Shelford, Editor
This classic sonnet is a rhymed, lyric poem of fourteen iambic pentameter lines. Today there are literally hundreds of varieties of the classic formats. In this softcover booklet, four accomplished poets selected and experimented with some popular forms.

(5.00 plus tax)

Back to top


Steamships of the Two Henrys
by Edward A. Mueller
A hardcover book of an account of the Maritime Activities of Henry Morris on the Flagler and Henry Bradley Plant.

(27.00 plus tax)

Back to top


The Story of DeLand and Lake Helen
by Helen DeLand
This very interesting and informative book in hardcover was written by Henry DeLand’s daughter about her life and times here in DeLand and Lake Helen.

(25.00 plus tax)

Back to top


The Story of the Florida Railroad: Bulletin No. 86
by George W. Pettengill, Jr.
A paperback book published by the Railway and Locomotive Historical Society, with additions and corrections from Bulletin No. 88.

(20.00 plus tax)

Back to top


Speakin’ Suthern Like It Should Be Spoke!
by Nick and Wilann Powers
The authors have put a lot of Southern knowledge in this funny softcover book with your
interest in mind, as well as your money.

(5.99 plus tax)

Back to top


St. Johns River: An Illustrated History
by Donald Spencer
A softcover book with illustrations of nearly 300 vintage postcards of Florida’s more popular beaches and sites. It takes the reader on a virtual tour from the St. Johns source to its basin, giving insight into its history, tributaries, cities and attractions along the river.

(24.95 plus tax)

Back to top


Stetson University: The First 100 Years
by Gilbert L. Lycan
The author brings to the writing of this history of Stetson University three important ingredients: the objectivity of the scientific historian, the love of a loyal Stetson professor, and the compassion of the dedicated Christian. This hardcover book does all three.

(25.00 plus tax)

Back to top


Toy Train Tree
A “How-To” booklet, with detailed and instructions for creating an exciting Christmas tree filled with lit village houses and operating trains.

(10.00 plus tax)

Back to top


Upper Mississippi River Rafting Steamboats
by Edward A. Mueller
This hardcover book is an extraordinary collection of over two hundred contemporary photographs and illustrations depicting the river-rafting era, and are accompanied by short histories and anecdotes that preserve the story of “rafters,” the workboats that literally helped build a nation after the Civil War.

(45.00 plus tax)

Back to top


Volusia County’s West Side: Steamboats and Sandhills
by Ronald W. Williamson, with a Forward by Bill and Irene Dreggors
A 158-page paperback that features a collection of popular “Sense of Place” columns by the Daytona Beach News Journal award-winning writer, Ronald Williamson. The book chronicles the sleepy streams, poignant passages, and timeless traditions of the hilly western side of Volusia County. From slavery and segregation to Madame Clarissa Zaraza and may-haw jelly from swampy creeks, these stories are a moving account from a master storyteller.

(19.99 plus tax)

Back to top


The Volusian: Horatio S. Dexter
by John W. Turner, Jr.
John Turner, in this hardcover book about Horatio Dexter, writes about one of the most interesting times in the history of Florida, and has brought to life the Indians in Florida and Dexter's relationship with Andrew Jackson, then the Governor of Florida.

(17.50 plus tax)

Back to top


Wooden Fish Songs
by Ruthanne Lum McCunn
A softcover book on the life of Lue Gim Gong, who put his genius for plants to work in Florida, creating the orange hybrids that earned him international recognition as “the Citrus Wizard.” His story is told by the three women who knew him best: his mother, who strove to shield him from bitter family rivalries; Fanny Burlingame, the prim and deeply religious New England spinster who became his mentor and friend; and Sheba, daughter of a slave, who worked alongside him in Florida.

(24.95 plus tax)

Back to top


DeLand: A Photographic Tour
by Merrald and Virginia Shrader
The book is the sixth in a series of photographs by Merrald and Virginia Shrader of various areas of Florida, and they once again capture the natural beauty and history of a community, this time in the DeLand area, Blue Spring, Hontoon Island, and DeLeon Springs State Parks with its scenic waterways and extensive marine life. This book contains hundreds of beautiful photos, all in breathtaking color, making it a historical treasure to be enjoyed over and over.

($29.95 plus tax)

Back to top


The Story of Thornby: How Ordinary People Took on Government
by Sandra Walters The grassroots saga of Enterprise, a quiet little village located on the northern shore of beautiful Lake Monroe, and of a community's grit, guts and determination to preserve its history against all odds, including the local government which escalated to the state level three times, in a nine-year struggle that featured arson, hurricanes, political chicanery, personal attacks and 11 public hearings.

($29.95 plus tax)

Back to top


Memory Lane: The History of the Street Names of DeLand, Florida
by Louise Ball Caccamise

($20 plus tax)

Back to top


West Volusia Historical Society, Inc.Henry A. DeLand House Museum
Robert M. Conrad
Educational Research Center
Lue Gim Gong Memorial Garden
137 W. Michigan Avenue
DeLand, Florida 32720
Phone or Fax: 386/740-6813
www.delandhouse.com
e-mail: delandhouse@msn.com
Visiting Hours
Tuesday through Saturday
Docent led tours.
12 noon till 3:00 p.m.

Last tour begins at 3:00 p.m.
Group tours by appointment

Conrad Educational & Research Center Building
Tuesday Through Saturday
12 noon till 4:00 p.m.

Closed Sunday and Monday

 

 

 

Home - Museums - About the WVHS - Directions
Special Events- Our Store - Contact Info - Links

 
     

©2004 West Volusia Historical Society
Web Design: Tinker Graphics
Web Hosting: PlanetUSofA.com